Pulse: US


A tarnished American corporate icon: What happened with Boeing’s corporate governance?

A recent Rock Center for Corporate Governance at Stanford University program focused on the role of corporate boards in influencing corporate culture and assessing risk. The informative program presented current metrics for health corporate culture together with trends pointing to increasing emphasis on board’s oversight role in good governance to ensure effective ethics and compliance program.

Private Payroll Trend Remains Solid in December, Wages Poised to Accelerate in 2020


2019 ended on a mostly consensus note. The private payroll jobs trend remained clearly healthy. The jobless rate set a new cycle low (marginally). Aggregate hours worked came in below expectations but, with productivity gains and a surge in net exports, FMI is still looking for +2.5% or so real GDP growth for 19Q4.
 

The US Tax System Cannot Finance Medicare for All

Medicare for All remains the most contentious and consequential issue for 2020 Democrats. It’s easy to see why.  

Unrelenting Margin Pressures: Overcoming Healthcare’s Softening Revenues and Rising Expenses

Co-authored with Jeff Jones, Chief Commercial and Strategy Officer for Conifer Health Solutions.

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A perspective on corporate reforms and sustainability in Japan

The evidence is still out but hopes are high that Japanese institutional investors focused on sustainability and corporate governance reforms can convince Japan Inc. to comprehensively embrace reforms designed to improve productivity and ultimately deliver higher returns. Corporate governance reforms, a cornerstone of Abenomics, started taking hold in 2014. Today, GPIF, the world’s largest pension scheme is among their most vocal champion in linking reforms to a holistic emphasis on long-term sustainable investment strategies.

Japanese Corporate Governance: A Response to Marsha Vande Berg

This is a response to Marsha's piece here.

My Volcker anecdotes: The risk and reality of hubris


Of all my memories of Paul Volcker – I first met him in the early  1970s when we was UnderSecretary for Monetary Affairs at the US Treasury and I was editing The Banker – four are particularly persistent:

Volcker Offers Lessons for the Fed and Other Policymakers


The passing of legends prompts renewed consideration of their achievements and, of times, conjures not-so-favorable comparisons to their successors. Paul Volcker, who died at 92 this week, set the standard for bold monetary policy as Fed chairman from 1979 to 1987. Taking the helm amid stubbornly high and rising inflation and lackluster trend real growth, he faced the Federal Reserve’s greatest challenge since the Great Depression. Like that earlier episode, bad decisions by his predecessors had created much of the crisis.
 

Commercializing Breakthrough Drugs In a Value-Based Market

Co-authored with John Kerins, Director in Cain Brother’s Corporate M&A Advisory practice.

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