Pulse: China


EconVue Spotlight

EconVue Spotlight May 13, 2018 China's New Era?

I agree with a Twitter commentator today who said that US-China trade relations was giving him  whiplash after President Trump’s volte-face on ZTE.  For context, I recommend two new books with a longer view on the changes taking place in China.  The first, “The End of an Era” by Carl Minzer is truly a must-read for any China watcher. Devin Stewart at the Carnegie Council conducted a wonderful interview with Prof Minzer, which I’ve included below. 

China Recognizes Dominican Republic — We Should Worry

I would like to share with you my just-published article on the Dominican Republic's May 1, 2018 establishment of diplomatic relations with the PRC.  The work examines the activities which are likely to follow, based on other countries which have changed their diplomatic posture toward China in recent years.  It looks at the implications for the Dominican Republic and the region, and concludes with recommendations for US policymakers.The article is originally published by Newsmax.

Changing Perceptions is the Key to US-Sino Cooperation

"America and China are inevitably going to compete, but it would be unwise and even dangerous for the two countries to become enemies"

“Nobody wants a trade war”, wrote Singaporean Prime Minister Lee Hsien Loong in an opinion piece for The Washington Post, one of the most influential newspapers in America. This viewpoint must be widely echoed by most people who advocate free trade and globalization, but will the “America First” Trump administration be happy to agree?

False Spring? | EconVue Spotlight

Spring has been a bit tardy this year in the US, and I hear many other places, but not in Asia.  The title of a recent Brookings meeting at Northwestern University was “Japan, the United States, and the Future of Asia”  but the topic was Korea.  I posed the question of whether or not we are experiencing a false spring. Talks between the two Koreas, the US and China are certainly a hopeful development, but do they mask fundamental and growing divisions between the major powers in the Pacific? Together, these countries comprise half of global GDP.

EconVue Spotlight

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