Pulse: Healthcare


Symbiotic Disruption: Skilled-Nursing-REIT Ecosystem Adapts to Market Dynamics

Co-authored with Wyatt Ritchie, a senior banker focusing on Post-Acute Care and Outsourced Services.  

Nature thrives on symbiosis. Its many ecosystems would not exist without important relationships between sometimes strange bedfellows. The oceans’ most colorful coral reefs, for example, are often found in clear water relatively devoid of nutrients.

40 Years in the Payment Reform Wilderness: DRGs to Nirvana - Part 1

Co-authored with Gaurov Dayal and Jeff Smith of Lumeris.

In an ideal state, a well-functioning healthcare delivery system should provide the right care at the right time and the right place, while being accountable for clinical and financial outcomes.

"Indumbent" Healthcare Thinking: Prices Don't Matter

In a March 29th New York Times article, author Elizabeth Rosenthal chronicles America’s dystopian system for coding and billing medical treatments. Rosenthal concludes that the medical-billing system itself is a primal cause of the nation’s sky-high medical costs,
 

Darwinian Outsourcing: Big Pharma Adapts to Market Realities

Co-authored with Kristin Carey.

Competitive markets drive innovations in business efficiency and strategy. Twenty-five years ago, Big Pharma companies did little outsourcing. Fortified by robust cash flows and high profit margins, they exercised near-total control over drug discovery, testing, approvals, manufacturing and distribution.

Trumpian Healthcare Reform: A “Silver Linings” Legislative Playbook

Last Friday was supposed to be the shootout at the healthcare corral where Republican gunslingers were going to take the first major step toward repealing Obamacare. Instead legislators retreated to their offices with no shots fired.

Speaker Paul Ryan pulled the vote on the controversial American Health Care Act (AHCA) as moderate and conservative Republican Representatives pulled their support in droves.

AHA! Healthcare is Both a Right and a Commodity

In late January, I participated in an Oxford-style debate regarding whether healthcare is a commodity. The debate was the featured event at Tata Memorial Centre’s Platinum Jubilee Conference in Mumbai, India.

A packed auditorium of over a thousand attendees buzzed with excitement as Professor Antonio “Tito” Fojo (my opponent) and I walked on-stage. The conference theme, “HEALTHCARE: A Commodity or Basic Human Need?” put the spotlight on our contest. We were midway through the 3-day conference, and it was show-time.

Avoid Mediocrity: Turbo-Charge Performance with Strategic Partnerships

Co-authored with Jake Crampton

Market forces demand constant performance improvement and optimization of resources and assets. In today’s complex healthcare marketplace, agility, efficiency and quality are the new drivers of success. To successfully compete, healthcare systems will need to overcome their preferences for "owning" sub-optimal business functions and align with strategic partners that can deliver superior products and services.

Mile High Potential: NFL Veterans Tackle America’s Opioid Crisis

Co-authored with Richard A. Kimball, Jr.

Professional football has long since surpassed baseball as America’s most popular sport. The NFL’s Super Bowl is a national party. Super Bowls represent 19 of America’s 20 most-watched TV broadcasts.

115 million people tuned in for 2015’s thrilling New England Patriots-Seattle Seahawks contest. By contrast, only 40 million watch the historic deciding game of last year’s World Series when the hapless Chicago Cubs defeated the Cleveland Indians for their first championship since 1908 (any team can have a bad century).

Healthcare’s Forecast for 2017

President-Elect Donald Trump ran his campaign on a promise to repeal and replace Obamacare. His recent appointment of Rep. Tom Price, author of the “Empowering Patients First Act”[1], as HHS secretary indicates that he is serious.[2] Price's proposal is a market-based approach that reduces government spending, narrows the range of care that insurers are mandated to cover, offsets premium increases for older, sicker patients with tax credits, caps the employer-tax exclusion, and reverses Medicaid expansion. 

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